September 21, 2012

thekidshouldseethis:

This LEGO machine, or LEGO Great Ball Contraption, is 17 different modules of incredible. Transporting 500 mini soccer and basketballs over 101.7 feet (31 meters), this hypnotic project was created in two years from over 600 hours of build-time by Japanese LEGO machine mastermind Akiyuky (of previous LEGO machine fame).

This video! Every new piece of machinery was surprisingly surprising. And thanks to Gizmodo’s Jesus Diaz for making a list of the modules, in order: 

1. Ball factory
2. Zigzag stair
3. Zigzag lift
4. Pneumatic
5. Cup
6. Screw T1
7. Basket shooter
8. Mechanical train
9. Screw T2
10. Screw T3
11. Spiral lift T2
12. Elevator & coaster
13. Fork
14. Spiral lift T1 & step
15. Catch & release
16. Belt conveyor & pinball
17. 5-axis robot S750

Thanks, @kvetchup.

Related watching: Metropolis II at LACMA, how balloons are made, processing mushrooms, marble machineClockwork and all things Rube Goldberg.

(Source: thekidshouldseethis)

September 16, 2012

thekidshouldseethis:

“Hey kiddo, did you know that there’s a car that drives itself?” And so began the kid’s introduction to Google’s Driverless Car. From PC Mag

Google released the video to celebrate that it has safely completed 200,000 miles of computer-lead driving.

The video shows [Steve] Mahan sitting in the driver’s seat as the car steers itself, using radar and lasers to make sure the road is clear. The car takes him through the drive-through of Taco Bell, then to the dry cleaners as Mahan jokes that “this is some of the best driving I’ve ever done.”

“Ninety-five percent of my vision is gone, I’m well past legally blind,” Mahan says in the video.  ”Where this would change my life is to give me the independence and flexibility to go the places I both want to go and need to go, when I need to do those things.”

Google said it arranged Mahan’s ride through a carefully programmed route as a special test outside of its core research efforts.

“We organized this test as a technical experiment, but we think it’s also a promising look at what autonomous technology may one day deliver if rigorous technology and safety standards can be met,”

As I think so often when posting to TKSST: The future is now (finally)!

Değer biçmesi zor bir fayda. Bunun için şehirleri de baştan kurmak lazım. İstanbul’da düşünemiyorum

(Source: thekidshouldseethis)

September 16, 2012

thekidshouldseethis:

Watch streetball player Pat the Roc (Patrick Robinson) show off some truly excellent ball handling skills in this video for Let’s Go, the first song off the album Lightning by Matt and Kim. And how does Pat the Roc do it? Practice, kiddo. Lots and lots and lots of practice!

via The Curious Brain.

Çocuklar için

(Source: thekidshouldseethis)

March 4, 2012
TL’nin simgesi çok hoş

TL’nin simgesi çok hoş

March 4, 2012

thekidshouldseethis:

When sick people search the Web for remedies or tweet about their symptoms, they’re sending an early warning signal about disease outbreaks. Now scientists and public health officials are listening in.

From NPR: the perils, power and benefits of networks and our interconnectedness, both physical and virtual. File under: Epidemiology, “the study of the distribution and patterns of health-events, health-characteristics and their causes or influences in well-defined populations.”

Also, a great illustration for why we cover our mouths when we sneeze or cough. (Happily, that first sneeze made quite an impression on the co-curator.) Ick!

(Source: thekidshouldseethis)

March 4, 2012

thekidshouldseethis:

Sylvain lives in Paris and makes bulles de savon géantes! Giant soap bubbles! What I love about this video is that it appears to be in slow motion even though it’s not. Watch bubbles at this large scale; they undulate at a slow pace, and yet Sylvain seems to be moving here and there below them at normal speed… right? 

Buna bayılıp hemen küçük çapta denemelere başladık evde, çok eğlenceli…

(Source: thekidshouldseethis)

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